Spend Your Summer with SWAG

Do you enjoy writing and sharing ideas? Need a creative space for expression? The Student Writers Assembled Guild (SWAG), a creative writing club on Levine Campus, has extended virtual meetings throughout the summer term. 

Through student-led writing prompts, SWAG members write about a variety of topics in different genres such as fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Weekly meetings also serve as a positive release during these challenging times. Recent topics have included anxieties related to the COVID-19 pandemic and inequality and social issues.

SWAG is a community safe-space to receive positive and constructive feedback. Central Piedmont alumni, currently studying at North Carolina State University, East Carolina University, Appalachian State University, Queens and Wingate Universities, return to club meetings to share their experiences with current students.

Students write poetry, short stories, and screenplays while focusing on several skills such as voice, perspective, and dialogue development.

Members are also encouraged to develop works for publication. SWAG member and current student, Michael-Michelle Pratt recently published an article for Teen Vogue, titled Growing Up Black Between Trayvon Martin and George Floyd Has My Generation at a Boiling Point. Other members are actively submitting their work for publications as well.

Meetings are held every Thursday at 4 p.m. via ZoomStudents, faculty, or staff members interested in joining SWAG for the summer are encouraged to contact Elizabeth West at elizabeth.west@cpcc.edu.

New COVID-19 Chatbot Added to the Central Piedmont Website

Central Piedmont recently launched a temporary, new resource on pages of our website with COVID-19 information. Those pages feature a chatbot designed to answer questions about how the current pandemic affects our current and future students, and employees. We hope this new resource helps you find answers faster during this challenging time. This temporary COVID-19 chatbot is from a company called Ocelot, which is a current partner of the college to provide Financial Aid-related content. ​

Continue to visit the college’s COVID-19 Web page to review all announcements and instructions related to the coronavirus.

Advisory: Important Message from President Deitemeyer

Central Piedmont Community College President, Kandi W. Deitemeyer, Ed. D.

Since early March, our college, our city, state, and nation have been focused on the unanticipated effects of COVID-19. Our primary objective has been to keep our students, faculty, and staff safe and to determine the best path forward as we return to campus. That work continues, and we remain steadfast in ensuring our college and its campuses can provide the educational, social, and emotional support for our community. What our college means to so many is vital, and we must be more vibrant and ready to serve with new exceptional standards of excellence.

These months have been unprecedented in so many ways. I never imagined as we wrapped up the academic year our college, community, state, and nation would be immersed in more devastating circumstances that give us great pause about the care, safety, treatment, and concern for our fellow man: In the last few weeks COVID-19 has been in the forefront of our minds, but in the last few days, we have been reminded that there is more than a healthcare pandemic impacting our nation, our state, our community.

Central Piedmont is troubled and saddened by the events in Minneapolis and other cities around our nation, including here in Charlotte. The college acknowledges the pain, anger, fear, and other emotions felt deeply by those involved and even those watching from afar. The college knows these events affect many of our students and employees. It is our hope and prayer that everyone stays safe, that wise and peaceful actions win out over violence, and justice prevails for all involved.

This college has always condemned racism and bigotry, and the unfair treatment of minorities and will continue to do so. You will recall Central Piedmont champions equity as an institutional value and an institutional goal, and we do not take that lightly. Our college is committed to breaking down barriers to student access and achievement and providing pathways to family-sustaining careers or to further education. We embrace diversity and respect all individuals and the journeys they make to reach our college. Our work on equity is so important, and the courage we are showing as an institution will be even more important as our community heals and moves forward.

As leaders in our community, we must demonstrate our willingness to discuss our differences, share our perspectives, grieve together, and question how such events continue to occur. While we do, I ask that we continue to champion our mission and be a catalyst for opportunity in our community and move forward with intentionality to identify and address the inequities that we see in our community. As an institution of higher learning, we must be a safe haven for our students, faculty, and staff. As one college, we need to acknowledge members of our college community are hurting, and they need us more than ever.

If you are feeling concern, stress, or anxiety, the college reminds you counseling services are available to students and employees. Students simply need to complete the online Counseling Services form, and a college counselor will respond.

Please also remember, our Central Piedmont Cares team members are here to assist students and employees. Team members are ready to help at wecare@cpcc.edu, or see the Central Piedmont Cares website for more information.

PNC Awards Central Piedmont $25,000 Grant for Single Stop Program

The PNC Foundation has awarded Central Piedmont Community College a $25,000 grant to support the college’s Single Stop program, an initiative that connects students to the support services they need to succeed in college and administers the college’s Emergency Fund.

“Our entire community has been affected by COVID-19, and the pandemic has been particularly difficult for students who have lost employment and income ― and who depend on campus resources for access to learning and technology,” said Weston Andress, PNC regional president for Western Carolinas and a Central Piedmont Foundation board member. “During this challenging time, we want the Central Piedmont student community to know that we understand and are committed to helping address some of the hardships they are facing.”

Since 2016, Central Piedmont’s Single Stop program has served as a free, on-campus resource, removing barriers for students with critical needs by connecting them with resources to help them flourish academically, obtain good jobs and achieve financial stability ― through one-on-one meetings with experts representing the financial, tax and legal fields.

In addition to matching qualifying students with specific tools to help fuel upward mobility in their lives, Single Stop administers monies available through the college’s Emergency Fund, which provides one-time support of up to $500 for students who have emergency needs related to housing, utilities, medical expenses, food, technology and more.

The PNC Foundation’s gift is timely. The college will use the grant to help purchase the following items, which have been identified as students’ most pressing needs during the coronavirus pandemic:

  • Grocery/food gift cards. These items will allow students to purchase food, medicine and other essential products.
  • Technology access (laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots). The college has witnessed a surge in students needing laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots since it moved much of its course instruction online.
  • Resources for budgeting during a crisis. Single Stop’s financial counselors are implementing and delivering online and virtual sessions for individuals and groups who need crisis budgeting assistance. Each emergency grant recipient is contacted by a financial counselor with tips on dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic from a financial perspective.

“As a result of the pandemic, the college has witnessed an increase in the number of students needing resources to sustain their everyday lives in addition to their studies,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, president of Central Piedmont. “Many agencies in the Charlotte area have had to close temporarily, limiting the resources students can turn to for emergency crisis assistance. The PNC Foundation’s gift will help us streamline the connectivity process, ensuring resources such as nutrition assistance, technology support and financial aid reach the students who need them most in a critical time of need.”

Learn more about Central Piedmont’s Single Stop program. If interested in supporting the college’s Emergency Fund, visit https://secure.cpccfoundation.org/donation/.

Managing Stress Through Mindfulness with Counseling Services

Have you been looking for a way to cope with the daily stressors of being a student? Join Counseling Services online to learn about managing stress with mindfulness.

Research shows that practicing mindfulness is beneficial in many areas, including:

  • Better sleep
  • Lower stress levels
  • Improved attention
  • Dealing with depression and anxiety

Through practice and discussion, we will strengthen our ability to “begin again” in the present moment. Counseling Services will be hosting Mindfulness & Meditation sessions on:

  • June 11th 10:30-11:00am: Getting Started with Mindfulness: The Basics
  • June 18th 10:30-11:30am: Be Right Where you Are; Mindfulness for the moment

Please email Stephanie.Boyd@cpcc.edu to register for an upcoming session.

COVID-19 Update: NC Moves into Phase Two of COVID-19 reopening

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on Wed., May 20, signed an executive order moving the state into “Phase Two” of its COVID-19 pandemic reopening plan. The state’s ongoing stay-at-home order will end on Friday, May 22, at 5 p.m.

Phase two allows restaurants, which had been limited to take-out or delivery service, to open at 50% capacity for dine-in customers. Personal care services, like hair salons, can open at 50% capacity. Swimming pools can also open at 50% capacity. Summer camps, including overnight camps, also may reopen with restrictions. Childcare centers may reopen to all families.

Bars, nightclubs, indoor fitness facilities, public playgrounds and indoor entertainment facilities like movie theaters and bowling alleys will remain closed. Mass gathering restrictions allow no more than 10 people indoors and no more than 25 outdoors.

Professional and college athletes may resume training as long as they adhere to the mass gathering restrictions. Cooper said religious services are exempt from the order, which will run through June 26.

Central Piedmont’s Summer 2020 classes began May 20. The vast majority of these classes began online and some will be part online / part in-person. Most summer students should not come to campus over the next few weeks. All summer classes with scheduled meeting dates at a campus location will begin as fully online courses. Instructors will let their students know the exact dates for any on-campus activities later in the semester.

Students with any questions about classes should contact their instructors.

The vast majority of Central Piedmont employees will continue to work remotely. College leaders are working on plan for a phased-in return to campus work. To see the college’s most recent communication about the return of some on-campus classes, go to the May 8 communication – Some On-Campus Classes Resuming.

Central Piedmont to Host STEM Prep Courses June 22, Registration Now Open

Central Piedmont Community College will begin hosting a virtual STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) Prep, an academic enrichment program that helps prepare current Central Piedmont students and high school 11th and 12 graders for college-level STEM classes, on June 22. Students interested in participating in the program can visit cpcc.edu/ncsa.

NC STEM AllianceSTEM Prep is being made possible through a $1.5-million grant from the National Science Foundation to develop programs that boost the number of under-represented minority students pursuing associate and baccalaureate degrees in STEM subject areas.

Central Piedmont secured the grant funding in spring 2015 and is currently leading the North Carolina STEM Alliance (NCSA) with partners Forsyth Technical Community College (FTCC) and Guilford Technical Community College (GTCC) with the goal of enrolling increased numbers of high school students in community college associate-degree STEM programs and seeing those students continue their studies in bachelor-degree STEM programs. Each college wants to increase its number of under-represented minority STEM students by 50 percent. The grant period runs through June 2021.

During STEM Prep, students will gain increased familiarity with current practices in STEM fields, be able to illustrate preparedness for a successful transition into STEM studies at the college level and participate in a coordinated exploration of careers in one of the following STEM Prep courses:

STEM Prep – Science: Students will be introduced to biological concepts, including molecular biology. Students will use this knowledge, as well as the scientific method and their critical thinking skills, to design an experiment where they will analyze a segment of their own DNA.

STEM Prep – Information Technology: Students will be introduced to basic fundamentals of computer science and application development by developing small applications using an Integrated Development Environment. Upon completion of the course, students will have an understanding of basic programming design, debugging, sequence, selection and repetition.

STEM Prep – Engineering: Students will learn how to design, build and analyze projects using 21stcentury engineering strategies and technologies. Project experience will include the use of tools, such as but not limited to, 3D printers and CAD software.

STEM Prep – Mathematics: Students will participate in collaborative projects that relate to real-life applications of math concepts. In addition, each student will be provided with a personalized math enrichment plan aimed at filling gaps in their mathematics foundation and positioning them for success in their future mathematics studies.

In addition to the above courses, students will also receive STEM-focused mentoring, additional academic support, career-centered and proactive academic advising, and financial support. Classes will be held virtually on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. June 22 – July 16, from 1 – 3:30 p.m., and Thursdays from 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Charlotte Observer: From High School Dropout to Princeton

Christopher St. Hilaire felt isolated in high school and dropped out at just 15 years old. He later completed his studies, earning his GED from Central Piedmont in 2015. He immediately joined the workforce, working as a server at Ballantyne Country Club. A club member recognized St. Hilaire’s potential and urged him to go back to school. Thankfully, St. Hilaire heeded his friend’s advice and enrolled where he was most familiar: Central Piedmont.

“I came in with a mission. I came in with a goal … to make something happen. And I think the biggest takeaway from my experience is that, yes, what I do matters, but also that what community college students do matters. That just because you’re attending a community college doesn’t mean that what you do is any less important than what someone does at Princeton or at Harvard. It matters.”

Back on campus, St. Hilaire decided to be a part of everything the college community had to offer – Student Government Association, Rotaract, Model UN and Phi Theta Kappa. He excelled at Central Piedmont, and will graduate this week with an Associate (Transfer) Degree. This fall, St. Hilaire will move to New Jersey, where he will study philosophy at Princeton University on a full scholarship as one of only 13 community college students in the country to be admitted to the Ivy League school for the fall term.

“You can make something happen, too. You really can. You can make something great happen. You can transform your life. … I mean, Central Piedmont’s motto is ‘Conquer Possibility. So why not try?”  says St. Hilaire.

Central Piedmont Offers Expanded Evening, Friday and Saturday Courses this Fall

Beginning this fall, Central Piedmont Community College will offer expanded course offerings of some of its most in-demand classes on weekday evenings, Fridays and Saturdays at its Central, Harris and Levine campuses. The added course sections give students more options so they can complete a two-year, college transfer degree more quickly.

Central Piedmont’s new course offerings are comprised of more than 70 class sections of 20 high-demand, general education college transfer courses. The classes will be offered in sequential order and focus on a variety of subjects, ranging from biology and public speaking, to psychology and business.

“We’re excited about our new course offerings and how they will have a positive impact on our students’ lives,” said Edith McElroy, dean of Central Piedmont’s Levine Campus. “By offering more courses in the evenings, and on Fridays and Saturdays, we’re able to better accommodate our students’ busy schedules, setting them up for success both inside and outside of the classroom.”

This is the first time the college’s Harris Campus has offered high-demand college transfer classes to residents, giving individuals more options to complete an associate degree. In the past, its course offerings were specific to an academic program, such as baking & pastry arts, dental assisting, early childhood education and others.

In addition to offering more high-demand classes at Harris Campus, Central Piedmont will boast Saturday- only courses for students interested in earning a general Associate in Arts degree or an Associate in Arts degree in business administration in two years. Students seeking either of these degrees will be placed on a learning track that will require them to complete two to three courses, every eight weeks.

The additional courses and weekend accessibility will also give residents the opportunity to experience Central Piedmont – a college that believes in providing individuals with an affordable, hands-on education that will prepare them for the real world so they can make a difference in their community and beyond.

To learn more about Central Piedmont’s expanded weekday evening, Friday, and Saturday classes, please visit cpcc.edu/programs/associate-degrees or call Suzanne Marcoux at 704.330.4278 or email suzanne.marcoux@cpcc.edu.

Service-Learning Connections Newsletter Highlights Over 12,500 Service Hours

Throughout the 2019-2020 academic year, Service-Learning had over 2000 Central Piedmont students, faculty, and staff participate in service, which added up to more than 12,500 service hours spent making our community a better place!

Community-based service activities provide Central Piedmont students a wide range of experiences, which often benefit others and the community, while also advancing several curriculum goals.

Check out the 2019- 2020 Service-Learning Connections newsletter and see what a year of service at looks like at Central Piedmont!

Please contact Jesse.Bennett@cpcc.edu if you would like a hard copy of the newsletter.

Thank you for an amazing year! Service-Learning looks forward to connecting you to more service opportunities like these, next year!

Surgical Technology Students Earn 100% Pass Rate on Certification Exam

The Surgical Technology Program is pleased to announce that the May Class of 2020 successfully obtained a 100% passing on the NBSTSA CST exam. The certification demonstrates the individual meets the national standard for knowledge associated with a surgical technologist and surgical first assistance practice.

By earning this designation, student show potential employers they possess a mastery of a broad range of skills related to surgical procedures, aseptic technique, and patient care. And, because certification is voluntary, the choice to become certified exhibits a pride in the profession, the desire to be recognized for mastery of scientific principles, as well as an ongoing commitment to quality patient care.

Please join us in congratulating the following surgical tech students: Daniel Castaneda, Brandy Brown, Hali Burnette, Rachel Dumford, Alexis Scarborough, Samantha Marangone, Alizaya Thomas-White, Dustin Truong, Evelyn Brinkley, and Tatyana Shykal.

Learn more about Central Piedmont’s Surgical Technology program.

Free Shipping for Textbook Returns and Orders

The Barnes & Noble bookstore is closed for in-store purchases until further notice; however, all purchases and inquiries can be submitted on the Barnes & Noble website during regular business hours. Textbooks, Central Piedmont gifts and clothing can still be purchased online.

If you are planning to attend the summer term, now is the time to submit your textbook order to Barnes & Noble.

Financial Aid students may submit their orders on the Barnes & Noble website.  Once financial aid eligibility is confirmed for the summer term, your order will be shipped.

Rented Textbooks

Rented textbooks can be returned free by via UPS. Keep in mind, you will need your order number to print the UPS shipping label. This can be found in the confirmation email from your online order OR if you rented your textbook in store, find it in any of your rental reminder emails. The UPS label can be printed on or before your charge date. Please go online for the easy step-by-step Rental Return instructions.

Rentals can be returned at any time, but no later than June 15.

Need to sell your college books?

Barnes & Nobles has partnered with MBS Textbook Exchange, the nation’s largest textbook wholesaler, to offer you the best prices for your used books. You can pack and send your books free of charge, and receive payment within 3 weeks. 

Questions? Check out textbook rental FAQ’s or contact the bookstore with questions.

It’s Not Too Late – Complete your FASFA Today

Get ready to complete your 2020-2021 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form.

  • The FAFSA for 2020-21 is available now.
  • The FAFSA for 2020-2021 will collect income information from the 2018 tax year.
  • It’s not too late to complete the FAFSA for the 2019-2020 school year. The FAFSA for 2019-2020 uses information from the 2017 tax year.

Join us as we kick off FAFSA Tuesday’s, Friday’s and Saturday’s by hosting a FAFSA Workshop on all three days. FAFSA Workshops will continue through the month of June. Have a financial aid expert guide you through the process.

It is important to complete your FAFSA early as some funding is limited. Complete your FAFSA today.

Workshop Dates:

  • Friday – May 15                 10 am – 12:00 noon
  • Saturday- May 16              8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
  • Tuesday, May 19               10:00 am – 12:00 noon
  • Friday, May 22                   7:00 am – 9:00 am
  • Saturday, May 23              3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
  • Tuesday, May 26               10:00 am – 12:00 noon
  • Friday, May 29                   2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
  • Saturday, May 30              10:00 am – 12:00 noon

Join us online via WebEx Meetings. Please download the app onto your smartphone from the Google Play Store or Apple App Store. The login instructions will be emailed to you once you have scheduled your appointment. Sign up for an appointment today.

Before coming to the FAFSA workshops, students and parents will need to obtain an FSA ID to sign the FAFSA electronically.

  1. Go to fsaid.ed.gov.
  2. Create your FSA ID (username and password).
  3. Provide personal information (make sure your social security number, date of birth and name match what’s on your government-issued social security card).
  4. Provide profile Information (confirm information you entered and provide additional information). Make sure your information is correct. Errors could result in a delay or problem receiving aid.
  5. Select/create challenge questions and answers.
  6. Review info and agree to terms.
  7. Verify your email address.

Here’s what to bring to your FAFSA Workshop:

  • Your Social Security Number
  • Your Alien Registration Number (if you are not a U.S. citizen)
  • Your 2018 federal income tax returns, W-2s, and other records of money earned. (Note: You may be able to electronically transfer your federal tax return information into your FAFSA using the IRS Data Retrieval Tool.)
  • Bank statements and records of investments (if applicable)
  • Records of untaxed income (if applicable)
  • An FSA ID to sign electronically.

If you are a dependent student, your parent will also need to complete a portion of the FAFSA with the above information.

Additional Resources:

Thanks Extended to College Community for Contributing to “Community” Video

In mid-April, Communications, Marketing, & Public Relations (CMPR) asked you to submit content showing how our community is coming together even while apart during this challenging time.

Thanks to your response and submissions, the team was able to work with advertising and marketing agency Mythic to create the below “community” ads. The various versions will run across Charlotte, on network and cable tv, as well as digital/streaming platforms, YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook.

Thank you for your help with this project; CMPR couldn’t have done it without you!

Long-form:

 

30-second spot:

15-second spot: