CPCC Student Chad Robinson Visits White House, Meets President

CPCC Computer Integrated Machining Program student and Siemen’s Apprentice, Chad Robinson,

Chad Robinson in front of the White House

Chad Robinson in front of the White House.

met Friday with President Trump, Germany’s Chancellor Merkel, and some American business giants who are squarely leading the attack on the alarming U.S. skills gap (6 million unfilled jobs) by creating once-in-a-lifetime opportunities for high school teens to on-board paths that lead directly to economic prosperity.  Apprenticeships for teens were spotlighted by President Trump and industry giants while establishing a national  “moonshot goal” of creating 5 million apprenticeship opportunities for American teens.

Read the complete article here.

 

Charlotte Observer article: They’re getting a head start on high-tech careers

Owen Sims is still in high school, but the 17-year-old is already headed toward a well-paying career at a high-tech manufacturer.

The home-schooled senior from Concord works a few hours a day, five days a week at Max Daetwyler Corp., a custom machine maker in Huntersville. Within a few years, he’ll have learned and worked in every department at the company.

He does it as part of the Apprenticeship 2000, a program of five Charlotte-area manufacturers that trains students on the job, pays for their college and guarantees them work after graduation. The program, offered at CPCC, is marking its 20th anniversary this year.

To read the complete article, click here.

WFAE-FM Story: Charlotte, Workforce Development and Apprenticeships

In previous centuries, people took apprenticeships to learn a trade.  Today, apprenticeships are returning as a way to prepare the next generation of workers. There are about 375,000 apprentices working around the U.S. and the president wants to double that number over the next five years. In this region, ten community colleges are banding together to be part of this. Learn about CPCC’s role, what it’s  accomplished and what remains to be done, here.