CPCC Open House Saturday, October 15

Your Visual Arts faculty will be at the Fall 2016 CPCC Open House! What about you?

Drawing classroom with students working on a simple value study

Drawing students work on a value study during class at CPCC’s Central Campus.

You are invited to CPCC Open House 2016!  Experience what makes CPCC one of the top community colleges in the nation and why you should consider us as your first choice. Engage with faculty and staff at more than 50 information tables representing academic programs, student services and student life.  Explore our campus on a guided tour with one of our Student Ambassadors.

Visual Arts faculty will be available to answer your questions from 10:30am–1pm at the Worrell Building, Central Campus.  For a full schedule, visit: Fall 2016 Open House

 

CPCC Visual Arts Faculty Build Relationships at UNC-G Foundations Summit

The entire CPCC Visual Arts Department attended a two-day Foundations Summit hosted by University of North Carolina-Greensboro in September. Seven UNC 4-year art department faculty met with numerous community college art faculty to discuss ways to facilitate the pathway for transfer students. Faculty participated in sessions on the following topics:

  • Art 121 (Design I)
  • Art 122 (Design II)
  • Art 131 (Drawing I)
  • Art 114 (Art History Survey I)
  • Art 115 (Art History Survey II)
  • Art 117 (Computer Art)
  • Review of 4 year institution portfolio requirements and procedures

    Faculty also enjoyed a guided tour of Weatherspoon Art Museum, located adjacent to Gatewood Art Building on the campus of UNC-G.

Ceramics instructor Paula Smith and Chair Mary Kilburn pose with Deborah Butterfield's "Lunalilo", a steel sculpture of a small horse at Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina-Greensboro.

Ceramics instructor Paula Smith and Chair Mary Kilburn pose with Deborah Butterfield’s “Lunalilo”, a steel sculpture a Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina-Greensboro. Photo by Carolyn Jacobs

Drawing I Gets Collaborative

CPCC drawing students

Alexandra Gianell’s Drawing I class collaborates on an experimental drawing

Drawing I is having FUN. Sometimes you just have close your eyes (or put a blindfold on) and EXPLORE. That’s exactly what adjunct Drawing instructor Alexandra Giannell’s Drawing I class is doing.

How does a mark-making feel?

How close am I to an edge? 

Alexandra-drawing

What happens if I draw with my whole body instead of just my hand?

How does collaborating change the art-making process for me? Can I trust?

Alexandra-drawing2

Giannell states:

Day 1 included collaborative blind mark-making, exploring our fullest range of marks on two large pieces of paper (aprx. 3x 6 ft. each). Day 2 consisted of re-entering these abstract pieces in two groups, responding to a still-life, attempting to reign the drawing, navigating and articulating the fields of marks. These exercises were about 1.5 – 2 hours long in nature, requiring full engagement from the students. I was really impressed with their creativity in the mark-making as well as how they communicated while attempting the still-life.

Alexandra-drawing4 Alexandra-drawing5 Alexandra-drawing6 Alexandra-drawing7 Alexandra-drawing9 Alexandra-drawing10

Great work, Drawing I !!

See instructor Alexandra Giannell‘s work.

Math Emporium Art Project: “Abacus” by Paula Smith’s Advanced Ceramics Students Now Installed

The Math Emporium Art Project is a collaborative project with CPCC Visual Arts Department and the Math Emporium to fill the space with math-theme works of art created by CPCC students. On January 16, 2015, the first work–Abacus–was installed.

"Abacus"

CPCC Instructor Paula Smith with "Abacus"

An Abacus, or counting frame has been in use centuries before the formal written numeral system, and is still in use in many cultures today. Though ancient in origin, the abacus is still utilized in the early years of institutional schools as an aid in teaching arithmetic. Visually impaired learners find using the abacus helpful because of its physical nature. The earliest abacus that used beads on rods dates from the 11th century in China and was called a suan pan, which means “calculating plate”. It is felt by many that using the abacus strengthens the student’s sense of number placement value and helps to further a better overall understanding of numbers.  In 1979, the Chinese Abacus Association was founded. Forbes.com ranks the abacus as the second most important tool of all time.

"Abacus-detail"

"Abacus-detail" by Paula Smith and Advanced Ceramic Students, Math Emporium, CPCC

The CPCC Visual Art Department was invited by the Math Emporium to submit ideas based on mathematical themes. Paula Smith volunteered her Advanced Ceramics class and asked them to come up with various design concepts. Many ideas were thrown around until it was decided that a large, interactive abacus would be the best option.  All of Smith’s Advanced Ceramics students were assigned to make ten- four inch hollow ceramic balls, which could be individualized by using stamps, textures, and/or cut-outs.  Students then used colored under glazes and/or glazes to finish the surface treatments. Smith and class made 104 balls, giving them some room for final design options. With assistance from Ashley Knight, CPCC Sculpture Instructor, a metal framework was formed to complete the design.

“Abacus” is a large-scale, interactive sculpture that invites the viewer to touch by moving the balls and desires to become a public art focal point for the Math Emporium and their students.

Paula Smith, CPCC Ceramics Instructor; Ashley Knight, CPCC Sculpture Instructor

Ceramics II, III, IV, and Studio students: Rasheda Barner, Dee Bujalski, Minjeong Choi, Renee Holiday, Girvard Justice, Janet Lasher, Mary Jane McKnight, Jodi McNeely, Suzanne Mellichamp, Justine Read, Phil Sciabarrasi, Leslie Scott, Fred Vohwinkel

More installations coming soon! Drawings and photography!

The Math Emporium Art Project is now accepting proposals for Spring 2015. Please contact Project Manager, Carolyn Jacobs at carolyn.jacobs@cpcc.edu for more information.

CPCC Painting Students Visit McColl Center Artist Beverly McIver

Isaac Payne’s Painting II students had the opportunity to spend some time with McColl Center resident artist Beverly McIver recently. Ms. McIver welcomed the students into her McColl Center studio and discussed her work in detail during the visit.

Painting II students during a private studio visit with Beverley McIver, during her Residency at the McColl Center. Photo by Haris Vehabovic

 

Studio Visit : Painting I with Isaac Payne

Students working hard in Isaac Payne's Spring 2014 Painting I class.

Korky Yang completes her self-portrait as Gustave Courbet in Isaac Payne's Spring 2014 Painting I class.

Painting I investigates a number of introductory painting methods, materials and concepts. Drawing I (Art 131) and Design I (Art 121) are strongly recommended before registering for Painting I–students will get the most out of the class if they have this solid foundation to build on. If you have questions about the the Painting program at CPCC, please contact painting instructor Isaac Payne at Isaac.Payne@cpcc.edu

CPCC Ceramics Instructor Paula Smith at Lark and Key Gallery’s “Home Grown-Home Thrown”

Paula Smith, "White Fig Leaf Teapot with bird"

Paula Smith, CPCC full time ceramics instructor will be participating at a Lark and Key gallery function called “Home Grown-Home Thrown”, the theme is “dessert”, (Paula’s favorite subject). The gallery will have specialty local food vendors with samples of their desserts and coffees while myself, Jen Mecca, and Julie Wiggins will be demonstrating various ceramics building methods, (both hand building and throwing on the wheel).

All are invited:

Where: Lark and Key Gallery

128 East Park Ave. Charlotte, NC 28203 704-334-4616

www.larkandkey.com

When:  Thursday, November 13, 2014 6:30-9:30pm

Paula Smith at Lark and Key Gallery