You’re Invited to Attend a Screening of “The Anonymous People” on April 17

The Central Piedmont Collegiate Recovery Community invites you to attend a screening of “The The Anonymous PeopleAnonymous People.”

Central Campus, Overcash Center, Tate Hall
April 17, 2019; 6:30 p.m.
Panel Discussion to follow with:

  • Mary Ferreri – Founder of Emerald School of Excellence
  • Jessica Dunson – UNCC CRC Coordinator
  • Tony Beatty – President APNC and NCFADS
  • Chris Campau – Director of Scholastic Recovery, APNC
  • Sylvia Parsons – MS, LCASC, MAC, Interventionist

Deeply entrenched social stigma have kept recovery voices silent and faces hidden for decades. The vacuum created by this silence has been filled by sensational mass media depictions of addiction that continue to perpetuate a lurid public fascination with the dysfunctional side of what is a preventable and treatable health condition. Just like women with breast cancer, or people with HIV/AIDS, a grass roots social justice movement is emerging. Courageous addiction recovery advocates have come out of the shadows and are organizing to end discrimination and move toward recovery-based solutions. The moving story of “The Anonymous People” is told through the faces and voices of the citizens, leaders, volunteers, corporate executives, and public figures who are laying it all on the line to save the lives of others just like them. This passionate new public recovery movement is fueling a changing conversation that aims to transform public opinion, and finally shift problematic policy toward lasting solutions.

Join Us for a Screening of “The Anonymous People” March 5

Student Life will be showing the film “The Anonymous People” on Thursday, March 5, 2015, at 10 a.m. in Tate Hall.

“The Anonymous People” is a feature documentary film about the more than 23 million Americans living in long-term recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs.  Deeply entrenched social stigma and discrimination have kept recovery voices silent and faces hidden for decades. The moving story of “The Anonymous People” is told through the faces and voices of the leaders, volunteers, corporate executives and celebrities who are laying it all on the line to save the lives of others just like them. This passionate new public recovery movement is fueling a changing conversation that aims to transform public opinion, and finally shift problematic policy toward lasting recovery solutions.

Please join us to watch and discuss this documentary.

You’re Invited to a Film Screening on Oct. 2

The Collegiate Recovery Community will host a screening of “The Anonymous People” on October 2, 2014 from 2 until 4:30 p.m.  The event will take place on Central Campus in the Elizabeth Classroom Building, Room 1106.  A The Anonymous Peopledescription of the movie is below:

“The Anonymous People” is a documentary film about the more than 23 million Americans living in long-term recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction. Deeply entrenched social stigma have kept recovery voices silent and faces hidden for decades. The vacuum has been filled with sensational mass media depictions of people with addiction that perpetuate a lurid fascination with the dysfunctional side of what is a preventable and treatable health condition. Just like women with breast cancer, or people with HIV/AIDS, a grass roots social justice movement is emerging. Courageous addiction recovery advocates have come out of the shadows and are organizing to end discrimination and move toward recovery-based solutions.  The moving story of The Anonymous People is told through the faces and voices of citizens, leaders, volunteers, corporate executives, public figures, and celebrities who are laying it all on the line to save the lives of others just like them. This passionate new public recovery movement aims to transform public opinion, engage communities and elected officials, and finally shift problematic policy toward lasting solutions.

After the movie a community leader in the recovery movement will lead a discussion of how to advocate while maintaining anonymity.

This event is open to all CPCC students, faculty and employees, especially those who consider themselves to be an advocate for people in recovery.