Questions About the U.S. Census? We Have Your Answers.

April 1, 2020, was Census Day. If you’ve already participated, thank you for shaping the future of Mecklenburg County by ensuring our community receives the valuable resources it needs, such as healthcare, education and transportation support.

In general, students in colleges and universities temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 virus will still be counted as part of this process.

If you haven’t completed the census because you’re concerned about how the data will be used, if your personal information will be safe, or what you will be asked, let us answer some of those questions for you here:

What if I don’t complete the census?

The U.S. Census is required by the U.S. Constitution. Though the U.S. Census has extended their timeline and temporarily suspended field operations due to Covid-19, we want to emphasize that it has never been easier or safer to respond to the census on your own, whether online, over the phone or by mail—all without having to meet a census taker.

Will my personal information be safe?

Your responses will be safe, secure, and protected by federal law. Answers can only be used to produce statistics – they cannot be used against you in any way. The census will protect your data through the safest and best practices available.

What will I be asked?

Examples include: how many people are living or staying in your home, whether the home is owned or rented, the relationship of each person in your home, and others. You will not be asked about your citizenship status.

Why am I being asked about race and origin?

This information helps federal agencies monitor compliance with anti-discrimination provisions, such as the Voting Rights Act and the Civil Rights Act.

Don’t put Mecklenburg County at risk for losing funding by going under-counted in 2020. Make it count by completing the 2020 Census. For more info, visit MeckCounts2020.com.

What is the difference between “Stay at Home” and “social distancing”?

Social distancing refers to collective actions taken by Public Health officials to stop or slow down the spread of a highly contagious disease. Since there is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019, the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.This is why social distancing, although sometimes inconvenient, is vitally important. When done properly, it will limit the spread of infection. Stay at home is a stricter form of social distancing.

Stay at home means:

  • Stay home (stay unexposed and do not expose others)
    Only go out for essential services
    Stay 6 feet or more away from others
    Don’t gather in groups

YOU CAN

  • Go to the grocery, convenience or warehouse store
  • Go to the pharmacy to pick up medications and other healthcare necessities
  • Visiting a health care professional for medical services that cannot be provided virtually (call first)
  • Go to a restaurant for take-out, delivery or drive-thru
  • Care for or support a friend or family member
  • Take a walk, ride your bike, hike, jog and be in nature for exercise – just keep at least six feet between you and others
  • Walk your pets and take them to veterinarian if necessary
  • Help someone to get necessary supplies
  • Receive deliveries from any business which delivers

YOU SHOULD NOT

  • Go to work unless you are providing essential services as defined by the recent Stay-at-Home Order
  • Visit friends and family if there is no urgent need
  • Maintain less than 6 feet of distance from others when you go out
  • Visit loved ones in the hospital, nursing home, skilled nursing facility or other residential care facility, except for limited exceptions
  • Travel except for essential travel and activities

For the full Proclamation, go to MeckNC.gov/COVID-19. For further questions, call the Mecklenburg County Stay at Home help line at (704) 353-1926. Hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Make it Count! Participate in the 2020 Census.

Have you heard about the 2020 Census? Census Day is April 1, 2020, but we are already spreading the word about how important the census is to Mecklenburg County.

Why?

Because the census brings valuable resources to our community, such as federal funding for things such as healthcare, education, and transportation.

The census is a count taken every 10 years of every person in the U.S. It’s convenient, safe, and required. In the weeks leading up to the Census Day, you will receive a letter in the mail from the census asking you to respond online. Don’t have a computer? That’s okay. You can participate by phone or request a paper copy.

*International students and students with special needs: Please note there will be online and phone options available in English and 12 other languages. Also, the census will make available print and video language guides in 59 languages, including American Sign Language, braille, and large print guides.

It only takes a few minutes to ensure your family is counted. Everyone counts – from newborns to senior citizens! To learn more, visit MeckCounts2020.com.

Students Gain $3.20 for Every $1 Invested in Their Central Piedmont Education

The results of an economic impact study conducted for Central Piedmont Community College found the institution contributes $1.2 billion annually to the Mecklenburg County economy, an amount equal to one percent of the county’s gross regional product.Central Piedmont’s measured annual $1.2-billion economic impact includes $155.4 million in operations spending, $36.5 million in construction spending, $42.1 million in student spending, and a $919.5-million impact made by college alumni who live and work in Mecklenburg County.

“For more than 56 years, Central Piedmont Community College has established a record and reputation for making a positive impact in Mecklenburg County,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, Central Piedmont president. “We know generations of students and hundreds of employers have benefitted from having a comprehensive college and workforce development partner such as Central Piedmont serving Charlotte-Mecklenburg. We also know Central Piedmont makes a significant impact as an economic engine, boosting the county’s economy and generating an excellent return on the investment made by students and taxpayers.”

The economic modeling firm Emsi conducted the study, looking at college data from the 2017-18 fiscal year. The study found that for every dollar students invest in their Central Piedmont education they receive $3.20 in future earnings for an annual rate of return of 15.5 percent. For every dollar of public money invested in the college, taxpayers receive $1.70 for an average rate of return of 4.5 percent.

For more details about the economic impact study, see the Central Piedmont website.