The Diversity Committee Presents World Religions Panel Discussion, 2nd Session

The Diversity Committee presents: World Religions Panel Discussion, 2nd Session

Area faith leaders representing Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism will visit CPCC to participate in a panel discussion.
This session is ideal for students, faculty and staff.
Monday April 24, 2017; CPCC Central Campus, Tate Hall
Session: 10:30 a.m. – noon

 

The Diversity Committee Presents World Religions Panel Discussion

The Diversity Committee presents: A World Religions Panel Discussion
Friday, March 24, 2017, Tate Hall

Session starts at 10:30 a.m. Ends at noon.

The CPCC Diversity Committee is pleased to present Dr. Peter Judge from Winthrop University, Mrs. Rose Hamid, and Rabbi Dusty Klass as our guests for this event. In this first session, the Abrahamic faiths are discussed and each of our guests will speak about their particular faith and the similarities between Christianity, Islam and Judaism. This discussion is ideal for students, faculty and staff.

Our second session will cover the religions of Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism.

 

 

Diversity Committee Student Profile

Home Country: China

Leah

Leah

What is something about your country that others may not know about?

“ The classroom environment is much more relaxed here. School in China is a lot more stressful. I feel a lot more comfortable asking questions in class here. I learn a lot better here.”

 

Is there a cultural custom about your country you like most?

“In relation to school, teachers are held in a very high regard. Students show complete attention and respect at all times. I think teachers here should get more respect.”

 

What challenges did you face when entering the USA?

“ The language in this country is confusing. Before I came to USA, I could pick up a National Geographic and read it without a problem. I had a hard time with slang and accents. The English people speak here is not the English we learn in China.”

 

What do you miss most about your country?

“Of course my family and the food. The public transportation system is much better too. I never have to drive in China, which is nice.”

 

What do you like most about the USA?

“ The clean air. The seasonal changes here are much easier too. When it is cold here, it is not that bad.”

 

Diversity Committee Celebrates Women’s History Month

Shirley Jackson is the former head of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, where she reaffirmed the agency’s commitment to public health and safety. She is the first female African American to receive a doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Jackson’s outstanding leadership in education, science, and public policy demonstrates the capability of women to be leaders in the field of science and technology.

Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson


Diversity Committee Black History Fact

Before he was a renowned artist, Romare Bearden was also a talented baseball player. He was recruited by the Philadelphia Athletics on the pretext that he would agree to pass as white. He turned down the offer, instead choosing to work on his art.  He is considered one of the most important American artists of the 20th century.  Born in Charlotte, N.C., he landed in New York City and studied with George Grosz.  His early paintings were realistic with religious themes and depicted aspects of black culture in a Cubist style.  He was also a songwriter and designed sets for the Alvin Ailey Company.  The Romare Bearden Park located in Charlotte Center City opened in 2013 and is named in his honor

 

“Romare Bearden.” Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2015. Web. 24 Feb. 2015.

 

 

Diversity Committee – Black History Highlights: “The Friendship Nine”

On January  31, 1961, students from Friendship Junior College and others picketed McCrory’s on Main Street in Rock Hill, S.C., to protest the segregated lunch counters at the business. They walked in, took seats at the counter and ordered. The students were refused service and ordered to leave. When they didn’t, they were arrested. The 10 were convicted of trespassing and breach of the peace and sentenced to serve 30 days in jail or to pay a $100 fine. One man paid a fine, but the remaining nine — eight of whom were Friendship students —chose to take the sentence of 30 days hard labor. Their choosing jail over a fine or bail marked a first in the civil rights movement and sparked the “jail, no bail” strategy that came to be emulated in other places. They became known as the Friendship Nine.
On January 28, 2015, Judge John C. Hayes III of Rock Hill overturned the convictions of the nine, stating: “We cannot rewrite history, but we can right history.” At the same occasion, Prosecutor Kevin Brackett apologized to the eight men still living, who were in court.
Wikipedia contributors. “Friendship Nine.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 29 Jan. 2015. Web. 9 Feb. 2015

Diversity Committee Presents Little Known Black History Facts

In 1938, first lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged the segregation rules at the Southern Conference on Human Welfare in Birmingham, Alabama, so she could sit next to African-American educator and activist Mary McLeod Bethune. Roosevelt would come to refer to Bethune as “her closest friend in her age group.”  Bethune, a leader in the American black community founded Dayton Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls which later merged with Cookman Institute to form Bethune-Cookman College.  She also founded the National Council of Negro Women and was director of the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration.  Additionally, she served as special adviser on minority affairs to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. 

Diversity Committee Black History Program: “ Exploring Black Women in Hip Hop”

Speaker:  Dr. Felecia Harris
Date:  February 18
Time:  10:30-11:30 a.m.
Location:  Tate Hall

Diversity Student Profile: Korrie

Home Country: Canada Korrie
What is something about your country that others may not know about?
Canada is just as big as the USA and we have as much or more freedom.
 
Is there a cultural custom about your country you like most?
I really miss Tim Horton’s coffee. An American company just bought them, let’s hope they start to open them around here. Also, it is impossible to find sweet and sour fried ribs here.
What challenges did you face when entering the USA?
I find it offensive by how culturally ignorant people are here. People get hung up on race so much. It is always a white thing or a black thing. Back home we are just people living together. I find this difficult to become accustomed to.
What do you miss most about your country?
 I miss the long summer days. Sunset is not till 10:30 p.m.. Plus the mornings are so cool and crisp even in July.
What do you like most about the USA?
When it comes to a crisis situation, Americans are the ones to drop everything and help out. I’m not just talking about international relief. People seem to care a lot more when bad stuff happens to others.

Diversity Committee Student Profile

Jose Jose

Home Country: Mexico

What is something about your country that others may not know about?
“ In my country children live with their parents much later in life. It is common for grandchildren, aunts, cousins, and siblings to live in the same house. It seems to me that parents here in the USA want to kick you out once you turn eighteen.”

Is there a cultural custom about your country you like most?
“The customs I miss most has to be the food. You can go to a ‘Mexican’ restaurant, but it does not taste like home.”

What challenges did you face when entering the USA?
“The biggest problem I had was the language.”

What do you miss most about your country?
“I miss my family the most.”

What do you like most about the USA?
“ I like the career opportunities. In my country there were not a lot of options for a career. Your choices were very limited. Here it seems the possibilities are endless.”

 

 

Diversity Committee Spotlights International Student

Name:  Carolina 

Carolina

Home Country: Columbia

What is something about your country that others may not know about?

“My home city of Medellin won an international award for civic innovation. The mayor is very progressive. Columbia has a lot more to it than cocaine and Pablo Escobar. I hate that that is all people know about Columbia.”

Is there a cultural custom about your country you like most?

“I love the way we celebrate Christmas. Back home Christmas lasts nine days. Every night we will go to different people’s homes to celebrate. It is a much bigger celebration than here. I also miss the food!”

 What challenges did you face when entering the USA?

“ The biggest problem was getting used to American culture. A good example is using your car horn. Here people think you are a jerk for blowing your horn. Back home it just means ‘Hey, I’m coming through’. Americans are very easily offended.”

What do you miss most about your country?

“It would have to be my family. When I first came over with my parents, it wasn’t so bad. Now they have gone back to Columbia. I do not have any family in this country.”

What do you like most about the USA?

“ There is so much opportunity here. Plus jobs pay so much better. In Columbia your paycheck went to bills, there wasn’t any left over. Here I can go to a restaurant or put money in savings. I also like the diversity of America. Where else can you meet people from so many different backgrounds?”

 

The Diversity Committee Spotlights an International Student

The Diversity Committee is showcasing our international students.  Meet Erika Southern from Japan.

Erika Southern

Name: Erika Southern

Country: Japan

What is something about your country that others may not know?

We bow to greet one another on most occasions once formally introduced. More nonverbal communication is done.

Is there a cultural custom about your country you like most?

Summer festivals, there is lots of food, music and dancing.

What challenges did you face entering USA?

The diversity was shocking, we usually see people of our own kind. Friendly communication is more here than experienced in Japan.

What do you miss most about your country?

The food; it’s amazing.

What do you like most about USA?

The freedom, you choose how you want to live.

 

 

The Diversity Committee Features CPCC’s International Students

The Diversity Committee is showcasing students from other countries.  Here’s a brief bio on Brunelle Mpembe from the Congo.

Brunelle Mpembe

Brunelle Mpembe

Name: Brunelle Mpembe

Country: Congo

What is something about your country that others may not know?

Four primary languages are spoken but all schooling is done in French.
Is there a cultural custom about your country you like most?

Our New Year is celebrated different than the USA. It is like Christmas in the Congo

What challenges did you face entering USA?

A language barrier

What do you miss most about your country?

My family, I am the only one here for school, so I truly miss them.

What do you like most about USA?

I like a lot of things, such as the people, different cultures, and especially the food. (I still learning how to cook it.)

Diversity Committee Shares a Ecuadorian Recipe

The Diversity Committee presents recipes from all around the world.  Try this tasty dish from Ecuador.

LLAPINGACHOS (Potato Cakes) 

Llapingachos (yah-peen-GAH-chos) are a popular side dish in the highlands of Ecuador. They are often served with fried eggs and a simple salad of lettuce, tomato and avocado. Sometimes sausages and a side of rice are added to make a full and typically Ecuadorian meal.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 pounds potatoes, peeled and sliced
  • 4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) butter
  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 2 cups Munster cheese, shredded lard, butter, or oil
  • salt

HOW TO PREPARE:

Boil the potatoes in salted water until soft. Drain and mash. Heat the butter in a skillet and sauce the onions until they are very soft.

Add the onions to the mashed potatoes, mixing well. Shape the potatoes into 12 balls.

Divide the cheese into 12 parts and stuff each of the potato balls with the cheese, flattening them as you do so into cakes or patties about 1 inch thick. Chill in the refrigerator for about 15 minutes.

In enough lard, butter, or oil (with or without annatto as you please) to cover the bottom of a skillet, sauce the potato cakes until they are golden brown on both sides.

Diversity Committee Shares a Peruvian Recipe

The Diversity Committee presents recipes from all around the world. Try this tasty dish from Peru.

Peruvian Chicken Soup

Peruvian Chicken Soup

Peruvian Chicken Soup (Aguadito de Pollo)
Ingredients:
·       4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – cut in half
·       salt and pepper to taste
·       1/2 cup olive oil
·       1 medium onion, chopped
·       1 teaspoon minced garlic
·       1 tablespoon seeded, minced serrano chile
·       1/2 cup chopped cilantro
·       1 cup green peas
·       1 cup corn
·       1/2 red bell pepper, chopped
·       10 cups chicken broth
·       4 Yukon Gold potatoes, cut in half
·       1 cup uncooked white rice
Directions
1.    Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy pot over medium-high heat. Stir in the onion, garlic, and serrano chili; cook until the onion has softened, about 1 minute. Add the chicken, and continue to cook for 5 minutes.
2.    Stir in the cilantro, peas, corn, and red pepper; cook for 1 minute. Pour in the chicken broth, potatoes, and rice. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until the chicken is opaque and the potatoes are tender, about 40 minutes.

Diversity Committee Shares a Recipe

The Diversity Committee presents recipes from all around the world.  Many CPCC students hail from Bhutan, a landlocked nation on the southern end of the Himalayas. Try this refreshing and simple Bhutanese side salad.  Perfect for spring and summer!Cucumbers with Onion and Cheese

Cucumbers with Onion and Cheese

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 large seedless cucumber, sliced into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 medium red onion peeled and quartered
  • 1/2 cup crumbled farmer’s cheese
  • 1 medium fresh green chili pepper, seeded and diced
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions:

1. Chop the cucumber coarsely.

2. Chop the onion finely.

3.  Combine in a bowl with remaining ingredients and mix gently.