FBI Cracking Down on “Lasing” with National Campaign

Earlier in the year, the FBI was seeing an increasing number of teens using laser pointers to blind pilots in flight. You wouldn’t think the pointer could reach a cockpit in flight, but it can. In fact, lasers may reach a target up to one mile away. When aimed at cockpits, the lasers can blind pilots, creating unsafe conditions in the cockpit/aircraft they are operating. As of December 2013, the FAA had documented at least 35 incidents where pilots required medical attention after a laser strike.

To crack down on this increasing trend, the FBI is expanding its trial program, aimed at deterring people from pointing lasers at aircraft—by rewarding those who provide information about individuals who engage in this dangerous crime and aggressively prosecuting the perpetrators.

A key part of the publicity campaign is reward money. The FBI will offer up to $10,000 for information leading to the arrest of any individual who intentionally aims a laser at an aircraft.

In the meantime, the FBI is working with state, local, and international law enforcement on the campaign, and are conducting outreach to schools to educate teens about the dangers associated with lasing. The original initiative, which began nearly four months ago, took place in 12 FBI field offices where “lasing” incidents are prevalent. Since then, there has been a 19 percent decrease in the number of reported incidents in the major metropolitan areas of those offices.

Interfering with the operation of an aircraft has long been a federal crime, but in 2012, a new law made it a felony to knowingly point the beam of a laser at an aircraft. The new law lowered the threshold for prosecution and the trend is on the rise for jail time in these cases.

To learn more about the FBI’s campaign and lasing, please visit http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2014/june/protecting-aircraft-from-lasers-trial-program-being-expanded-nationwide.

CPCC Announces Two New Job Appointments

Dr. Kevin McCarthy

Dr. Kevin McCarthy

Dr. Kevin McCarthy

CPCC has named Kevin McCarthy vice president for institutional advancement. McCarthy has served CPCC for seven years as the College’s chief advancement officer, leading the CPCC Foundation. He has worked in higher education fund raising for 25 years, serving both public and private institutions.

“I’m honored and humbled to assume this position and to be of service to the College and our students,” McCarthy said. “I look forward to working with Dr. Zeiss and our college and foundation leaders in meeting our campaign goal of $30 million. This is a great opportunity to tell CPCC’s story and build on our generous external support.”

For more information about CPCC’s 50th anniversary “Legacy & Promise” campaign, see http://cpccfoundation.com/50th-anniversary/.

Janet Malkemes

Janet Malkemes

Janet Malkemes

CPCC has chosen Janet Malkemes to lead its Cato Campus and Professional Careers Division.

Malkemes has served CPCC since 2009 as associate dean of Corporate and Continuing Education, co-leader of the College’s Displaced Worker’s Task Force, and most recently as interim dean, Cato Campus and Profession Careers Division. The College’s Professional Careers programs include Horticulture and Turfgrass Management, Interpreter Education and American Sign Language, Office Administration and Paralegal Technology.

“We are delighted to have Janet Malkemes leading the Cato Campus and Professional Careers programs,” said Richard Zollinger, CPCC vice president for learning. “Janet’s experience as an educator, attorney, finance professional and diplomat makes her uniquely qualified to guide our rapidly-growing Professional Careers Division and important Cato Campus. She will play a key role in CPCC’s efforts to serve our students and the community.”